Summer 2013

 

 

BEHIND THE IMAGE:

The Painted Surface

and Its Technical Study

July 22-26, 2013

 

The Yale University Art Gallery

and the Yale Center for British Art

What hidden details of an artist’s working practice reveal themselves through close observation of individual artworks?  How might careful study of an object’s condition lead to a better understanding of original intent? How best to synthesize technical studies with traditional art historical approaches, such that each more effectively complements the other?

The third annual Summer Teachers Institute in Technical Art History (STITAH) will consider these stimulating questions and more, through a vigorous week-long intensive seminar to be held at Yale University, New Haven, CT, July 22-26, 2013.  Made possible through the generous support of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, the course will focus on painted surfaces, in order to provide a broad introduction to technical art history for art history faculty teaching at the undergraduate level.

The STITAH presents a multi-faceted approach to the topic, including direct instruction, discussion, practical workshops and hands-on activities, drawing on works of art selected from the rich collections of the Yale University Art Gallery and the Yale Center for British Art.  Faculty will include conservators and curators from both institutions, as well as guest lecturers. Study units will focus on painted surfaces from the ancient world to the 20th century, including 3rd century Roman painted ceremonial shields from Dura Europos, works in tempera and oil as well as polychromy, and British and American watercolors.  Hands-on practical sessions devoted to tempera, oil painting, acrylics and water coloring will complement the lectures.  A final program will be posted once available.

Participating professors will be encouraged to explore and, in turn, receive guidance in creative ways of integrating technical art history into their own classes, whether introductory undergraduate courses or courses at the more advanced undergraduate and graduate level.  The Institute will provide relevant course readings and reading lists, and other curricular materials, for use in the participants’ own teaching and research.

Is it for you?

Full-time art history faculty at North American colleges and universities are eligible to apply.  No background in science or conservation is required.  Consideration will be given to dual applications from an art history professor and a science professor who teach collaboratively at the same institution.  No more than fifteen faculty members will be admitted to the program, and applicants will be evaluated based largely on their expressed commitment to integrating technical art history into their own teaching curricula.

Stipends and fees

Thanks to the generous support of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, participating faculty will receive hotel accommodation near Yale’s campus and a $61 per diem. 

Participants are asked to pay a modest registration fee of $200 to ensure participation.

How to apply

Applications should submit:

  • a cover letter,
  • a statement of purpose describing both the courses they teach and their interest in integrating technical art history into their teaching
  • an academic and professional CV

Completed applications are due by April 1, 2013, and should be emailed to:

Sarah Barack, Samuel H. Kress Fellow in Technical Art History

E-mail: sarah.barack@yale.edu

They may also be sent to:

Sarah Barack, Samuel H. Kress Fellow in Technical Art History

Yale University Art Gallery

P.O. Box 2087271

New Haven, CT 06520-08271